Volume 8, Issue 6, December 2019, Page: 317-322
Research on the Influence Depth of Soil with Different Burn Severity in the Burned Areas of E’gu Village in Yajiang County
Wang Yan, Faculty of Geosciences and Environment Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China
Hu Xiewen, Faculty of Geosciences and Environment Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China; State-province Joint Engineering Laboratory of Spatial Information Technology for High-Speed Railway Safety, Chengdu, China
Jin Tao, Faculty of Geosciences and Environment Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China
Yang Ying, Faculty of Geosciences and Environment Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China
Chao Xichao, Faculty of Geosciences and Environment Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China
Received: Nov. 18, 2019;       Published: Nov. 18, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.earth.20190806.12      View  40      Downloads  14
Abstract
The high temperature caused by forest fires often leads to changes of soil properties, however, there is few detailed studies on the influence depth of soil properties caused by different fire severities. Taking the burned areas of E’Gu Village in Yajiang County as the research object, the influence depth of soil with different fire severity was revealed with the help of field and laboratory experiments in this paper. According to the research results, the influence depth of forest fire on soil natural density, bulk density and porosity is less than 2cm, and the influence depth on moisture content is more than 2cm. But only in the severely burned soil, the bulk density and porosity behaved significant differences when contrast to unburnt soil. The influence depth of lightly burn on soil water repellency was 1cm, and the influence depth of moderately and severely burn on soil water repellency is 3cm. In addition, the variation of soil repellency in burned area was in direct proportion to burn severity. The influence depth of forest fire on soil permeability is not more than 4 cm, and the influence of lightly burn on soil permeability is not significant, while in moderately and severely burned areas, the soil permeability changes significantly.
Keywords
Burn Severity, Soil Physical Properties, Water Repellency, Permeability, Influence Depth
To cite this article
Wang Yan, Hu Xiewen, Jin Tao, Yang Ying, Chao Xichao, Research on the Influence Depth of Soil with Different Burn Severity in the Burned Areas of E’gu Village in Yajiang County, Earth Sciences. Vol. 8, No. 6, 2019, pp. 317-322. doi: 10.11648/j.earth.20190806.12
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