Volume 7, Issue 6, December 2018, Page: 268-274
Method Established for Source Apportionment of Human Health Risk in Regional Atmospheric Environment
Huanbo Wu, Inner Mongolia Meteorological Services Center, Hohhot, China
Xiao Liu, Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
Wenkai Guo, Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
Qiang Chen, Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
Received: Oct. 18, 2018;       Accepted: Nov. 6, 2018;       Published: Nov. 30, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.earth.20180706.13      View  20      Downloads  15
Abstract
Previous studies of source apportionment were only focused on contribution rates of pollutants concentration, but have not evaluated contribution rates of influencing degree of pollutants on people's health. To assess the health risk of pollution source to human health in the atmospheric environment, a method of source apportionment of human health risk, which the health risk assessment method combined with the source apportionment receptor model, was established in this research. Based on each pollution source contribution to metallic elements in inhalation particle matter (PM10) at the sampling site of Lanzhou University, the health risks contribution rates to exposed group were estimated according to the established method, and compared with the results of source apportionment. The results were as follows: the concentration contribution rates calculated by chemical mass balance (CMB) model rank from high to low as vehicle exhaust dust (43.4%), urban fugitive dust (29.9%), coal fly ash (21.5%), construction cement dust (1.2%) and metal smelt dust (0.7%); the non-carcinogen hazard index (Rn) contribution rates rank from high to low as urban fugitive dust (87.7%), vehicle exhaust dust (5.9%), coal fly ash (3.0%), metal smelt dust (2.5%) and construction cement dust (0.9%); the cancer risk value of carcinogen (Rc) contribution rates rank from high to low as urban fugitive dust (97.1%), vehicle exhaust dust (1.7%), coal fly ash (0.5%), metal smelt dust (0.5%) and construction cement dust (0.2%). Apparently, the concentration contribution rates were very different from the hazard index of non-carcinogen (Rn) contribution rates and the cancer risk value (Rc) contribution rates. The source with the highest concentration contribution was not the major influence on human health. The influence of source with the contribution rate lowest concentration contribution on human health should not be ignored. This method could also be used in health risk assessment of other pollutants from other sources.
Keywords
Health Risk Assessment Method, Chemical Mass Balance Model, Source Profiles, Contribution Rate, Respiratory Inhalation
To cite this article
Huanbo Wu, Xiao Liu, Wenkai Guo, Qiang Chen, Method Established for Source Apportionment of Human Health Risk in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Earth Sciences. Vol. 7, No. 6, 2018, pp. 268-274. doi: 10.11648/j.earth.20180706.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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